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Codroy Valley has potential Norse Viking settlement site

Point Rosee in the Codroy Valley
Point Rosee in the Codroy Valley

The area was originally named Stormy Point, according to a survey performed by the British Admiralty in 1893-4.

Today, locals call it Point Rosee. It has become the area of attention, as media outlets in the United States acknowledge the potential for a second Norse Viking settlement.
Although there is room for speculation, education and growth in the area for archeologists, one Codroy Valley man is convinced the discovery of an iron ore hearth is part of a much bigger settlement.
Wayne MacIsaac said he has been reading and studying the Norse Sagas for years, and has been wondering ever since he was a young child if the areas referenced in the Sagas were indeed a part of the Codroy Valley.
He depicts a high interest in the Norse Vikings and said stories were passed along to him from his grandfather of a ships discovery, the skeletons of three men, and an arrow head found on Little River, approximately four miles away from the potential settlement site.

Today, locals call it Point Rosee. It has become the area of attention, as media outlets in the United States acknowledge the potential for a second Norse Viking settlement.
Although there is room for speculation, education and growth in the area for archeologists, one Codroy Valley man is convinced the discovery of an iron ore hearth is part of a much bigger settlement.
Wayne MacIsaac said he has been reading and studying the Norse Sagas for years, and has been wondering ever since he was a young child if the areas referenced in the Sagas were indeed a part of the Codroy Valley.
He depicts a high interest in the Norse Vikings and said stories were passed along to him from his grandfather of a ships discovery, the skeletons of three men, and an arrow head found on Little River, approximately four miles away from the potential settlement site.

Maps from the British Admiralty created in 1893-4 originally called the area Stormy Point.

Archaeologist Sarah Parcak, who uses satellite imagery to locate artifacts, made the discovery of the iron ore hearth. Her work is more known for discoveries in Egypt, buried ruins in the sands.
The evidence so far has been described as promising for signs of Norse Vikings.
The potential for future tourist attractions are high, when compared to L’Anse aux Meadows, which is know for the Viking lifestyle, artifacts, hiking trails, picnic areas and gift shops.

chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

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