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Ripe for discussion


When the loonie is low, it seems many people in other parts of the country start to realize something we seemingly always grapple with in Newfoundland and Labrador — the soaring cost of putting food on our tables.

In this province, the price of pretty much everything edible is typically higher at the best of times because of our isolated location, not to mention most of our food is imported first into the country, then across the gulf to our markets.
We may constantly gripe about the costs without taking much action to effect change. But if anything positive can come from people outside this province also being hit with pricey produce, perhaps it might be the beginning of a national conversation about our food security.
Kristie Jameson of Food First NL said recently Newfoundlanders and Labradorians may never completely escape our dependency on outside circumstances when it comes to food costs, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t things we can all do to help lessen what we spend to feed ourselves. The key is getting everyone to buy into the conversation and finding the will to make it happen.
Food First NL has a discussion guide on its website, foodfirstnl.ca, with tips on beginning that discussion at home, in our communities and on the provincial level.
During a period when a large number of Canadians are also feeling the pinch, what better time for action on the part of the people and politicians of this province to begin that dialogue?
As the organization says on its site, we can attend forums on food security in western Newfoundland when they’re held. If none are scheduled, why not organize one? We can also start conversations at home or at work, with family or friends. You can guarantee you’re not the only one concerned about that total on your weekly grocery bill.
The danger in having food costs so high for so long is complacency — we eventually accept these inflated prices as the norm.
Until, that is, there is a tipping point brought by anger, frustration and lighter wallets.
It’s an issue that’s ripe for discussion, now more than ever.

In this province, the price of pretty much everything edible is typically higher at the best of times because of our isolated location, not to mention most of our food is imported first into the country, then across the gulf to our markets.
We may constantly gripe about the costs without taking much action to effect change. But if anything positive can come from people outside this province also being hit with pricey produce, perhaps it might be the beginning of a national conversation about our food security.
Kristie Jameson of Food First NL said recently Newfoundlanders and Labradorians may never completely escape our dependency on outside circumstances when it comes to food costs, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t things we can all do to help lessen what we spend to feed ourselves. The key is getting everyone to buy into the conversation and finding the will to make it happen.
Food First NL has a discussion guide on its website, foodfirstnl.ca, with tips on beginning that discussion at home, in our communities and on the provincial level.
During a period when a large number of Canadians are also feeling the pinch, what better time for action on the part of the people and politicians of this province to begin that dialogue?
As the organization says on its site, we can attend forums on food security in western Newfoundland when they’re held. If none are scheduled, why not organize one? We can also start conversations at home or at work, with family or friends. You can guarantee you’re not the only one concerned about that total on your weekly grocery bill.
The danger in having food costs so high for so long is complacency — we eventually accept these inflated prices as the norm.
Until, that is, there is a tipping point brought by anger, frustration and lighter wallets.
It’s an issue that’s ripe for discussion, now more than ever.

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