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Real change to be determined


There’s no denying the Liberal stronghold in Long Range Mountains, in the province and in Atlantic Canada. Or even the country, especially if the expected federal election result followed the polling.

Gudie Hutchings, a political newbie, owned the riding in every sense. She capitalized on the popularity of former MP Gerry Byrne, as well as the charismatic Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau to walk away with the easy win.
She captured nearly 74 per cent of the popular vote, which amounted to almost 31,000 people in her corner. The people — or 59 per cent of the eligible electorate, at least —have spoken loud and clear; two cliches earned in this case.
The campaign, given its length, brought with it many ups and downs nationally, but few hot-button topics on the local level. It wasn’t for lack of opportunity. There were more public forums throughout the great expanse of the district than ever before, bringing with them a chance for people to get out and meet the candidates tête-àtête.
Sure, there was a little mud-slinging and likely more behind the scenes, along with the expected conspiracy theories, but the controversy proved minimal.
It seemed more people wanted to talk about the race between the leaders, which is where this election was won and lost. From the talk of hair to the niqab to the sudden dip of the NDP and the bizarre collection of newspaper endorsements, the campaign’s focus was national from start to finish.
And in that fight, Trudeau came out the clear winner.
Now, Canadians will find out in short order if he is indeed ready. They will get an opportunity to see close-up the substance of his leadership and vision and the strengths of his team.
On the local level, the people of Long Range Mountains will see if Hutchings’ popularity as a businesswoman and community volunteer extends beyond that of fresh campaign face, and where this riding sits — and hopefully flourishes — in a new government.

Gudie Hutchings, a political newbie, owned the riding in every sense. She capitalized on the popularity of former MP Gerry Byrne, as well as the charismatic Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau to walk away with the easy win.
She captured nearly 74 per cent of the popular vote, which amounted to almost 31,000 people in her corner. The people — or 59 per cent of the eligible electorate, at least —have spoken loud and clear; two cliches earned in this case.
The campaign, given its length, brought with it many ups and downs nationally, but few hot-button topics on the local level. It wasn’t for lack of opportunity. There were more public forums throughout the great expanse of the district than ever before, bringing with them a chance for people to get out and meet the candidates tête-àtête.
Sure, there was a little mud-slinging and likely more behind the scenes, along with the expected conspiracy theories, but the controversy proved minimal.
It seemed more people wanted to talk about the race between the leaders, which is where this election was won and lost. From the talk of hair to the niqab to the sudden dip of the NDP and the bizarre collection of newspaper endorsements, the campaign’s focus was national from start to finish.
And in that fight, Trudeau came out the clear winner.
Now, Canadians will find out in short order if he is indeed ready. They will get an opportunity to see close-up the substance of his leadership and vision and the strengths of his team.
On the local level, the people of Long Range Mountains will see if Hutchings’ popularity as a businesswoman and community volunteer extends beyond that of fresh campaign face, and where this riding sits — and hopefully flourishes — in a new government.

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