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A historic reign


On Sept. 9, Queen Elizabeth II surpasses her great-great grandmother, Queen Victoria, as Britain's longest-reigning monarch. Her reign currently stands at 63 years, 217 days.

These two queens have witnessed the development of Canada, from a then fledging dominion in 1867 to the country — the world’s second largest — we live in today.
Just as Victoria signed Canada into existence more than 148 years ago, Elizabeth II patriated the Canadian constitution in 1982.
In the last 60 years, our country has grown. Canada is more pluralistic, multicultural and multilingual than Victoria’s time, when our first Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald quipped, “A British subject I was born — a British subject I will die.”
During her visit to Canada in 2010, Queen Elizabeth noted how, “It is very good home.”
As one of the few constants in Canada's political history and development, the Crown has been and continues to be a source of stability for many. Our judicial, executive and parliamentary traditions, while not always perfect, have done a good job at ensuring “peace, order and good government.”
The role of the Crown in Canada, just like Canadian society in general, has changed with the times, of course. And throughout history, our connection to the Crown has bent, but never broken.
Despite views on the future of the monarchy in Canada, Queen Elizabeth II is internationally admired for her wisdom and devotion to public service.
Think about the tens of thousands of Canadians, Britons, Australians and other Commonwealth realm citizens who turn out for a chance to just catch a glimpse of her. Not many politicians can command that kind of international following or reputation.
Let's put aside politics and the repetitive debate over the place of the monarchy and give a hearty cheer to a lifetime of service to Canada and the world that continues even now.
 

These two queens have witnessed the development of Canada, from a then fledging dominion in 1867 to the country — the world’s second largest — we live in today.
Just as Victoria signed Canada into existence more than 148 years ago, Elizabeth II patriated the Canadian constitution in 1982.
In the last 60 years, our country has grown. Canada is more pluralistic, multicultural and multilingual than Victoria’s time, when our first Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald quipped, “A British subject I was born — a British subject I will die.”
During her visit to Canada in 2010, Queen Elizabeth noted how, “It is very good home.”
As one of the few constants in Canada's political history and development, the Crown has been and continues to be a source of stability for many. Our judicial, executive and parliamentary traditions, while not always perfect, have done a good job at ensuring “peace, order and good government.”
The role of the Crown in Canada, just like Canadian society in general, has changed with the times, of course. And throughout history, our connection to the Crown has bent, but never broken.
Despite views on the future of the monarchy in Canada, Queen Elizabeth II is internationally admired for her wisdom and devotion to public service.
Think about the tens of thousands of Canadians, Britons, Australians and other Commonwealth realm citizens who turn out for a chance to just catch a glimpse of her. Not many politicians can command that kind of international following or reputation.
Let's put aside politics and the repetitive debate over the place of the monarchy and give a hearty cheer to a lifetime of service to Canada and the world that continues even now.
 

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