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Twin Towns History with Clayton Billard


In January of 1933 the Twin Towns experienced a week of severe frost.

The day started with Thanksgiving services in the churches. Rev Clarke at the United Church was assisted by Capt. Wheeler of the Salvation Army.
All the societies paraded to St. James Church where the Rev. Canon Read officiated. Members of the three Lodges: the S.U.F; the L. O. A.; and the L.O.B.A., all attended in full regalia along with the local companies of Boy Scouts, Cubs, Guides and Church Lads Brigade led by the War Veteran’s G.W.V.A.
After the church services the organizations paraded to the War Memorial where, with large number of citizens, a very short service was held.
About 1:30 p.m. the children were again assembled on the grounds of the respective schools. The children from Grand Bay and Mouse Island, two settlements situated between two and three miles away, came from all that distance to join with the children of Channel and Port aux Basques in making one parade of close to 900 young people.
The school teachers, with the assistance of the Boy Scouts and the Church Lads' Brigade, distributed to each child the special Jubilee Medal.
The children were then marched to the churches where a service was held especially for them. Following the church service a flag was given to each child and preceded by the Band from the Salvation Army they paraded through the town. The parade wended its way down around Channel and up part way to Port aux Basques.
Upon the return march a stop was made at the War Memorial where the National Anthem was sung. In the meantime a committee of ladies were busy preparing supper to be served to the children upon their return from the parade, and as no single building in the town could even nearly accommodate the numbers, tea was served simultaneously in the Anglican Parish Hall and in the United Church School Hall. The children were all commended for their good behaviour. Baskets of food were delivered to the elderly and others who were not able to personally attend.
After supper, as soon as it was dark, there were fireworks to end the day of celebration which was enjoyed by adults and children alike.
Dances were then held in the S.U.F. and L.O.L Halls well into the night. An event like this had never been held in Channel before and no doubt His Majesty’s Silver Jubilee would be long remembered by the participants.    
The Rev. Clayton Billard is a retired Anglican minister and an avid historian. Comments are welcome. If you have documents that may of interest, contact chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

The day started with Thanksgiving services in the churches. Rev Clarke at the United Church was assisted by Capt. Wheeler of the Salvation Army.
All the societies paraded to St. James Church where the Rev. Canon Read officiated. Members of the three Lodges: the S.U.F; the L. O. A.; and the L.O.B.A., all attended in full regalia along with the local companies of Boy Scouts, Cubs, Guides and Church Lads Brigade led by the War Veteran’s G.W.V.A.
After the church services the organizations paraded to the War Memorial where, with large number of citizens, a very short service was held.
About 1:30 p.m. the children were again assembled on the grounds of the respective schools. The children from Grand Bay and Mouse Island, two settlements situated between two and three miles away, came from all that distance to join with the children of Channel and Port aux Basques in making one parade of close to 900 young people.
The school teachers, with the assistance of the Boy Scouts and the Church Lads' Brigade, distributed to each child the special Jubilee Medal.
The children were then marched to the churches where a service was held especially for them. Following the church service a flag was given to each child and preceded by the Band from the Salvation Army they paraded through the town. The parade wended its way down around Channel and up part way to Port aux Basques.
Upon the return march a stop was made at the War Memorial where the National Anthem was sung. In the meantime a committee of ladies were busy preparing supper to be served to the children upon their return from the parade, and as no single building in the town could even nearly accommodate the numbers, tea was served simultaneously in the Anglican Parish Hall and in the United Church School Hall. The children were all commended for their good behaviour. Baskets of food were delivered to the elderly and others who were not able to personally attend.
After supper, as soon as it was dark, there were fireworks to end the day of celebration which was enjoyed by adults and children alike.
Dances were then held in the S.U.F. and L.O.L Halls well into the night. An event like this had never been held in Channel before and no doubt His Majesty’s Silver Jubilee would be long remembered by the participants.    
The Rev. Clayton Billard is a retired Anglican minister and an avid historian. Comments are welcome. If you have documents that may of interest, contact chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

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