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Local News 1932


A town’s history is not only about major events that happen over time. The Town’s story is also told through the hundreds of little events that occur in people’s lives - “the local news”. Here are some items from 1932. In May of 1932, Mr. M. P. Smart came to town to take up the position of general manager at the Port aux Basques Cable Office.

The ice floe was still in the Gulf during the month of May which Capt. Seeley of Channel took advantage of and went after another load of seals.
The men of the town have been busy putting the roads back in good condition.
In June, Saul Jones, started a bakery and restaurant in Dingwell’s store on the main road in Port aux Basques. On the 15th of June the home of Mrs. Levalliant caught fire due to an overheated stove pipe. Had it not been raining at the time, it may have proved to be a more serious disaster.
In June “election fever” was in the air. On Friday the 17th., the Government and Opposition candidates held a joint meeting in the Orange Hall. A large crowd attended and all went off very well. Saturday was Polling Day. Everybody was asking everybody else who they voted for. (To no avail). Booths were held at Lomond’s boarding house and J. Dingwell’s store in Port aux Basques and at the Court House in Channel. There was quite a bit of noise throughout the day, but no disturbances. Both candidates were in town all day. The next Wednesday a big dance was held in the Orange Hall to honor Mr. Winter who won the district election. There was a big crowd present, who danced away the night and a whole lot of the morning.
Nobody can say that the Twin Towns was behind the times. The latest recreation for summer was the addition of a lawn tennis court erected on the grounds of Lewis Sheaves by the Bank of Nova Scotia. A sport enjoyed and played by many of the young people.
On Tuesday, August 16th the Church of England held it’s garden party and in spite of the rain there was a large attendance. Wednesday turned out to be a fine day and most everybody that could go turned out. The great attraction was Bingo which was kept going while there was a prize left, and many splendid prizes were carried off by the lucky winners. The ladies were kept busy at the tea tables where a bounteous supper was served. Then there was the dancing stand which was kept going in full swing. All had a good time, and over a thousand dollars were taken in.

The two youth groups for boys was in full swing that year. On June 4th 1931, the Church Lads Brigade looked very smart as they paraded along the main road. They went as far as the water shoot in Port aux Basques, and spent an enjoyable hour in games etc. The company has grown since their last parade. Their numbers are fast increasing and all the boys are very interested. In July the company enjoyed a few days camping at Burnt Island brook. In September the C.L.B. held a party to start off the new season and a few pleasant hours flew away as the young folks spent a very enjoyable evening.
The Boy Scouts new scout master was police Constable Newhook. The Boy Scouts had arrived home on September 16th by Friday’s express from Red Rocks, where they had been spending the last ten days camping. The boys put in a splendid time taking in the sights around. They had the pleasure of being shown through Cape Ray lighthouse and the Marconi signal station. They spoke highly of the kindness of the Cape Ray folks. They also visited the old grave yard on the sand banks, where the bleached whiten skeletons of the long since dead are exposed to view by the shifting of the sands as the heavy sea come in at certain times. The people there take up boxes of bones and bury them elsewhere, but the relentless tide sweeps in and washes out more. The boys regretted they could not stay longer at Red Rocks. In the Fall the principal of the United Church school, Mr. Burden, replaced Constable Newhook as Scoutmaster.
Schools opened in September and teachers were made welcome. Miss Pudge and Principal Walters were new to the Church of England school. Miss Greeley and Miss Northover, former teachers of St. James school, were back again this term. New teachers, Miss Penny and Principal Burden, were also welcomed at the United School.
Early in September a sad drowning accident occurred. Frank Pike, son of Edward Pike, retired lighthouse-keeper, was drowned. Frank and his brother Will went out to their nets, but a heavy sea capsized their boat. Will managed to cling to the boat which was bottom up, hut Frank disappeared. The lighthouse-keeper, John Gillam, saw them from Channel Head, but by the time he got to them, there was no sign of Frank. Will was taken to land were first aid was rendered, and after a while he was brought around. The untimely death of Frank was very sad. He was only seventeen years of age.
In October a new boiler was being installed in the heating plant at the Railway depot. And it was planned that a fuel burning diesel engine would replace the steam engine for generating light at the terminal.
Early in December Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Rendall were welcomed to the Twin Towns. Mr. Rendall was to be the new manager of the local branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, replacing Mr. Blackie. The Choir and Ladies Aid of United Church presented Mr. and Mrs. Blackie with two pieces of gold in honor of their help and faithful community service during their years in Channel. The couple left by Friday night’s boat for the Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, where Mr. Blackie would take up his new position.
In December, Mr. Eli Manuel, long time postmaster at Channel died on Christmas Eve. Mr. Manuel had been sick for quite a while. For the joyful season of Christmas it was indeed a sad time for the family.
Late in December, Mr. Emmanuel Pike, accompanied by his son Robert, returned home from Halifax. Mr. E. Pike had been in the hospital at Halifax where he had his leg amputated.

The Rev. Clayton Billard is a retired Anglican minister and an avid historian. Comments are welcome. If you have documents that may of interest, contact chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

The ice floe was still in the Gulf during the month of May which Capt. Seeley of Channel took advantage of and went after another load of seals.
The men of the town have been busy putting the roads back in good condition.
In June, Saul Jones, started a bakery and restaurant in Dingwell’s store on the main road in Port aux Basques. On the 15th of June the home of Mrs. Levalliant caught fire due to an overheated stove pipe. Had it not been raining at the time, it may have proved to be a more serious disaster.
In June “election fever” was in the air. On Friday the 17th., the Government and Opposition candidates held a joint meeting in the Orange Hall. A large crowd attended and all went off very well. Saturday was Polling Day. Everybody was asking everybody else who they voted for. (To no avail). Booths were held at Lomond’s boarding house and J. Dingwell’s store in Port aux Basques and at the Court House in Channel. There was quite a bit of noise throughout the day, but no disturbances. Both candidates were in town all day. The next Wednesday a big dance was held in the Orange Hall to honor Mr. Winter who won the district election. There was a big crowd present, who danced away the night and a whole lot of the morning.
Nobody can say that the Twin Towns was behind the times. The latest recreation for summer was the addition of a lawn tennis court erected on the grounds of Lewis Sheaves by the Bank of Nova Scotia. A sport enjoyed and played by many of the young people.
On Tuesday, August 16th the Church of England held it’s garden party and in spite of the rain there was a large attendance. Wednesday turned out to be a fine day and most everybody that could go turned out. The great attraction was Bingo which was kept going while there was a prize left, and many splendid prizes were carried off by the lucky winners. The ladies were kept busy at the tea tables where a bounteous supper was served. Then there was the dancing stand which was kept going in full swing. All had a good time, and over a thousand dollars were taken in.

The two youth groups for boys was in full swing that year. On June 4th 1931, the Church Lads Brigade looked very smart as they paraded along the main road. They went as far as the water shoot in Port aux Basques, and spent an enjoyable hour in games etc. The company has grown since their last parade. Their numbers are fast increasing and all the boys are very interested. In July the company enjoyed a few days camping at Burnt Island brook. In September the C.L.B. held a party to start off the new season and a few pleasant hours flew away as the young folks spent a very enjoyable evening.
The Boy Scouts new scout master was police Constable Newhook. The Boy Scouts had arrived home on September 16th by Friday’s express from Red Rocks, where they had been spending the last ten days camping. The boys put in a splendid time taking in the sights around. They had the pleasure of being shown through Cape Ray lighthouse and the Marconi signal station. They spoke highly of the kindness of the Cape Ray folks. They also visited the old grave yard on the sand banks, where the bleached whiten skeletons of the long since dead are exposed to view by the shifting of the sands as the heavy sea come in at certain times. The people there take up boxes of bones and bury them elsewhere, but the relentless tide sweeps in and washes out more. The boys regretted they could not stay longer at Red Rocks. In the Fall the principal of the United Church school, Mr. Burden, replaced Constable Newhook as Scoutmaster.
Schools opened in September and teachers were made welcome. Miss Pudge and Principal Walters were new to the Church of England school. Miss Greeley and Miss Northover, former teachers of St. James school, were back again this term. New teachers, Miss Penny and Principal Burden, were also welcomed at the United School.
Early in September a sad drowning accident occurred. Frank Pike, son of Edward Pike, retired lighthouse-keeper, was drowned. Frank and his brother Will went out to their nets, but a heavy sea capsized their boat. Will managed to cling to the boat which was bottom up, hut Frank disappeared. The lighthouse-keeper, John Gillam, saw them from Channel Head, but by the time he got to them, there was no sign of Frank. Will was taken to land were first aid was rendered, and after a while he was brought around. The untimely death of Frank was very sad. He was only seventeen years of age.
In October a new boiler was being installed in the heating plant at the Railway depot. And it was planned that a fuel burning diesel engine would replace the steam engine for generating light at the terminal.
Early in December Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Rendall were welcomed to the Twin Towns. Mr. Rendall was to be the new manager of the local branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, replacing Mr. Blackie. The Choir and Ladies Aid of United Church presented Mr. and Mrs. Blackie with two pieces of gold in honor of their help and faithful community service during their years in Channel. The couple left by Friday night’s boat for the Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, where Mr. Blackie would take up his new position.
In December, Mr. Eli Manuel, long time postmaster at Channel died on Christmas Eve. Mr. Manuel had been sick for quite a while. For the joyful season of Christmas it was indeed a sad time for the family.
Late in December, Mr. Emmanuel Pike, accompanied by his son Robert, returned home from Halifax. Mr. E. Pike had been in the hospital at Halifax where he had his leg amputated.

The Rev. Clayton Billard is a retired Anglican minister and an avid historian. Comments are welcome. If you have documents that may of interest, contact chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

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