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Ramea receives full-time health care

Tanya Abrams is pictured about to board the helicopter, en route to one of the two coastal communities she serves.
Tanya Abrams is pictured about to board the helicopter, en route to one of the two coastal communities she serves.

Tanya Abrams fell in love with the remote town of Ramea the moment she saw it.

“It’s like the eighth wonder of the world,” said Abrams, describing her thoughts on Ramea, and Newfoundland in general.
It was her love of rural communities and her wanting to live in an outport town that brought her to Ramea; and the need for a full-time nurse.
Abrams is originally from Kingston, Ont. and graduated from Grace Hospital in Manitoba, where she gained her first working experience, followed by work in the Northwest Territories.
She moved back to Ontario in 1992 and completed her Bachelor of Nursing and primary health care nurse practitioner course from Queens University. She then spent 13 years as a nurse practitioner in rural family medicine practice in the southeastern part of Ontario before coming to Newfoundland.
Rural communities are her preference.
“The connection with the community is what is special to me – getting to know people, their history and generations of history is what I enjoy,” said Abrams.
When Abrams was in her 20s, she read a book titled Outport Girls, a small paperback.
“I fell in love with the idea of living in an outport,” said Abrams. “I was pregnant with our oldest son and I remember saying to my husband, ‘We have got to get to (Newfoundland)’ – it spoke to me in that book and it never left me.”
She described her husband and children as being very supportive.
“We looked at this as a family adventure,” said Abrams.
So much so, that before she obtained the nursing position, the family visited and purchased a cottage home.
Abrams recalled looking for term positions, somewhere to go as a holiday relief.
Ramea had an opening and she kept checking back and thinking about the opportunity as the position was left open.
After many times looking at it she started to think Ramea was the place she was meant to be.
“My husband said, 'You know what, this is your dream and we need to have you do this,'” said Abrams.
So, she signed on the permanent position with intentions of staying for at least one year.
Newfoundland has been kind to her.
“It’s so beautiful here – it takes my breath away,” said Abrams. “I can’t say anything but positive about the people I have met. They have been so gracious with their welcomes, and they inspire me.”
Part of what she loves the most is seeing people help each other and being happy.
She also enjoys her trips by helicopter to Francois and Grey River.
But it’s not all work for Abrams. She has been able to get out a bit, attend some winter carnival events and community dinners.
“There was even a skit that had a reference to my arrival and I think that was really special,” said Abrams.
She is thankful to the people of the province for their collective welcome and she looks forward to becoming even more a part of the community in the years to come.   
chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

“It’s like the eighth wonder of the world,” said Abrams, describing her thoughts on Ramea, and Newfoundland in general.
It was her love of rural communities and her wanting to live in an outport town that brought her to Ramea; and the need for a full-time nurse.
Abrams is originally from Kingston, Ont. and graduated from Grace Hospital in Manitoba, where she gained her first working experience, followed by work in the Northwest Territories.
She moved back to Ontario in 1992 and completed her Bachelor of Nursing and primary health care nurse practitioner course from Queens University. She then spent 13 years as a nurse practitioner in rural family medicine practice in the southeastern part of Ontario before coming to Newfoundland.
Rural communities are her preference.
“The connection with the community is what is special to me – getting to know people, their history and generations of history is what I enjoy,” said Abrams.
When Abrams was in her 20s, she read a book titled Outport Girls, a small paperback.
“I fell in love with the idea of living in an outport,” said Abrams. “I was pregnant with our oldest son and I remember saying to my husband, ‘We have got to get to (Newfoundland)’ – it spoke to me in that book and it never left me.”
She described her husband and children as being very supportive.
“We looked at this as a family adventure,” said Abrams.
So much so, that before she obtained the nursing position, the family visited and purchased a cottage home.
Abrams recalled looking for term positions, somewhere to go as a holiday relief.
Ramea had an opening and she kept checking back and thinking about the opportunity as the position was left open.
After many times looking at it she started to think Ramea was the place she was meant to be.
“My husband said, 'You know what, this is your dream and we need to have you do this,'” said Abrams.
So, she signed on the permanent position with intentions of staying for at least one year.
Newfoundland has been kind to her.
“It’s so beautiful here – it takes my breath away,” said Abrams. “I can’t say anything but positive about the people I have met. They have been so gracious with their welcomes, and they inspire me.”
Part of what she loves the most is seeing people help each other and being happy.
She also enjoys her trips by helicopter to Francois and Grey River.
But it’s not all work for Abrams. She has been able to get out a bit, attend some winter carnival events and community dinners.
“There was even a skit that had a reference to my arrival and I think that was really special,” said Abrams.
She is thankful to the people of the province for their collective welcome and she looks forward to becoming even more a part of the community in the years to come.   
chantelle.macisaac@gulfnews.ca

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