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A bit about Brad

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Brad Firth’s personal story is remarkable, in considering his journey begins with overcoming a 20-year crack cocaine addiction while surviving in Vancouver's notorious downtown east side.

He was always well known for his running ability, generally from the police at the time.

It was one of those police officers that finally sat Firth down to discuss turning his remarkable ability toward a healthier direction.

He was directed to Vancouver running clubs and a couple of years later, Firth's alter ego, "Caribou Legs" would be borne out of the healing that focused running gave him.

“Caribou Leg” is an old-style message runner of his people - Gwich’in.

During a previous run, Firth lost his sister in a domestic violence incident and he wanted to honour her in the best way he knew how – running.

And this run isn't without adversity either when you realize he is running alone, without any on-road support.

It's just him, a backpack and his hand drum, and daily phone and social media contact with his quarterback in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia - Robyn Lawson.

All funding for his running, surviving and educating needs are provided for via donations, speaking honorariums and a crowd-funding page.

He covers an average of 60 to 75 kilometres a day and sometimes as much as 100 kilometres in a day.

At times he's had to run several kilometres without water, he has had to sleep in broken and abandoned vehicles, barns, under boards at the side of the highway, and even a culvert will do.

For more on Firth’s story visit his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/cariboulegs1

He was always well known for his running ability, generally from the police at the time.

It was one of those police officers that finally sat Firth down to discuss turning his remarkable ability toward a healthier direction.

He was directed to Vancouver running clubs and a couple of years later, Firth's alter ego, "Caribou Legs" would be borne out of the healing that focused running gave him.

“Caribou Leg” is an old-style message runner of his people - Gwich’in.

During a previous run, Firth lost his sister in a domestic violence incident and he wanted to honour her in the best way he knew how – running.

And this run isn't without adversity either when you realize he is running alone, without any on-road support.

It's just him, a backpack and his hand drum, and daily phone and social media contact with his quarterback in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia - Robyn Lawson.

All funding for his running, surviving and educating needs are provided for via donations, speaking honorariums and a crowd-funding page.

He covers an average of 60 to 75 kilometres a day and sometimes as much as 100 kilometres in a day.

At times he's had to run several kilometres without water, he has had to sleep in broken and abandoned vehicles, barns, under boards at the side of the highway, and even a culvert will do.

For more on Firth’s story visit his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/cariboulegs1

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