Cadets celebrate at anniversary dinner

Natalie
Natalie Musseau
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Those listening to Master Warrant Officer Kyle Seymour give his report on the activities of the cadet corps got two things - a better understanding of cadets and a good laugh.

The entertaining Mr. Seymour gave the report at the 60th anniversary dinner for the 2357 St. James' Army Cadet Corps at the Royal Canadian Legion in Port aux Basques on Oct. 18.

Those listening to Master Warrant Officer Kyle Seymour give his report on the activities of the cadet corps got two things - a better understanding of cadets and a good laugh.

The entertaining Mr. Seymour gave the report at the 60th anniversary dinner for the 2357 St. James' Army Cadet Corps at the Royal Canadian Legion in Port aux Basques on Oct. 18.

He explained that his interest in the corps started when his older brother, who spent six years in cadets, would come home every Wednesday night and tell him all about the activities.

Mr. Seymour has now been in the organization for four years and sees many benefits to his participation.

He admitted that he didn't like the discipline at first but said, "it becomes a part of you." He said the skills learned, such as using a map and compass, are things cadets will take with them for the rest of their lives.

He said cadets taught him to be respectful in many situations and he an increase in respect from others due to that behaviour. "It shows who you are."

Now that Mr. Seymour is in front and in a leadership role, he knows he has to be a role model for the new cadets. He said he also understands how good participation in cadets looks on a resume.

But more than that, he said cadets is fun.

"I like to look at cadets as a second family," he said, adding that they always find the fun in their activities, such as snowshoeing last winter.

Guest speaker was Don Crewe then recounted some of his most memorable experiences while in the corps, such as his days at camp and as a leader. He concluded by saying he will always treasure his days with the 2357.

Command officer Charlie Osmond spoke briefly about the money invested into each cadet, at no cost to them. He said a full uniform can cost as much as $500 and camp can be as much as $3,000 per cadet per year.

Sam Munden, a constable with the RCMP and a captian with another cadet corps, was the master of ceremonies.

He said that some people make the mistake of thinking the organization is all about grooming young people for the military, when it really prepares them for all kinds of futures by giving them a good foundation.

"What you learn is not discipline, it's self-discipline."

editor@gulfnews.ca

Organizations: Cadet Corps, Royal Canadian Legion, RCMP

Geographic location: Port aux Basques

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  • Zoe
    June 28, 2010 - 14:29

    Many years ago my father George Richards worked along side with Charlie Osmond regarding the Cadets and he took great pride in it. They would take the kids on overnight trips with compasses, maps, and the rashin packs which I might add tasted pretty good. Who knew stew in a foil bag would taste wonderful. I am sure alot of those kids learned alot of lifes lessons that will be with them forever.There are so many wonderful benefits in joining and I would encourage todays youth to seriously consider been apart of this organization.